Oct 262014
 

Vancouver Parks commissioner Sarah Blyth was and AFAIK still is the only politician to go public with ADHD in North America while in office.

Sarah also helped to get Vancouver city council to be the first city in Canada to declare ADHD Awareness week with me & others in 2011.

Sarah Blyth

She recently did an op ed in the Georgia Straight Oct 21st on why we need to think of ADHD for the other 51 weeks of the year in BC.

Unfortunately, students with ADHD in B.C., unlike in provinces like Newfoundland and Alberta, do not qualify for help in classrooms unless they have learning disabilities or severe behaviour problems—and most do not. With class sizes as large as they are these days, teachers are left to struggle with little help and schools end up piecing together the best they can with little funding.

The large group of kids in this grey area that have a hard time in school, slip through the cracks and end up having difficulty in life which end up costing more long term.

BC’s  failing grade in CADDAC’s ADHD school report card page 2 shows this.

If the student with ADHD does not have a coexisting Learning Disability or does not display significant disruptive behaviour, they will not be identified.

Students with ADHD and no diagnosed LD may be excluded from receiving accommodations for their academic disabilities.

This lack of recognition encourages educators to believe that ADHD is not a legitimate disability.
Recognition under behaviour can lead to academic weaknesses not being addressed and the students being stigmatized.

Sarah goes on.

Later in life, some of these folks end up in our shelters, hospitals, and jails, unwanted in our society.

I have met many people who suffer with ADHD like me but have ended up in the DTES. They identify with my story and have come to me with their stories. Unfortunately, when people suffer anxiety and difficulties in life, drugs can be a way to escape.

20%+ of Addicts have ADHD.

21-45% of prisoners have ADHD 15 clinical studies show.

One study of 127 homeless participants showed that 1 in 3 participants met the established criteria for further evaluation for ADHD.

Only 5% of adults have ADHD.

I hope more politicians and others in BC go public and tell their stories about ADHD. Its a very powerful way to raise awareness of ADHD and counter the stigma we so often get.

 

Oct 202014
 

Charlie Smith, the editor of the The Georgia Straight did an article on the third annual BC ADHD Awareness Week 2014. B.C. ADHD Awareness Week draws attention to attention deficiencies

Its also in the print edition page 18 October 16-23rd 2014.

Here are some excerpts

Another occupation that’s notorious for its deadlines is journalism, which is why Quily suspects that this industry has a higher percentage of people with ADHD than the general population. He also said there are likely plenty of politicians with ADHD, although only one local elected official, Vancouver park commissioner Sarah Blyth, has revealed this publicly.

I explain why we’re using BC libraries and bookstore to raise awareness and reduce the heavy burden of stigma against adults and children with ADHD. They’re a natural fit.

“One of the worst problems with ADHD is the heavy stigma against it and the massive ignorance from all levels of society,” Quily said. “So if you want to reverse the stigma, a great way to do that is to provide facts, provide research, and provide stories by people who have ADHD or work with it.”

That’s the impetus behind B.C. ADHD Awareness Week, which runs from October 14 to 20. Quily and other volunteers with the Vancouver Adult ADD Support Group have partnered with 120 libraries and bookstores across the province to put up displays and posters to educate the public.

“You’re going to find books on ADHD for kids, teens, and adults, and books by ADHD adults who’ve written other books,” Quily said

I also mention as some long term readers may known me talk about the hide the politically embarrassing wait list by destroying the clinic technique.

For years, Quily has been pushing the B.C. Liberal government to reverse its 2007 decision to close the only provincially funded clinic for adults with ADHD at B.C. Children’s Hospital. One of his chief concerns is that people with the condition are being misdiagnosed.

“Sometimes bipolar can look like ADHD, and sometimes ADHD can look like bipolar, and sometimes you can have both,” Quily said. “A big problem is people say it’s not ADD, it’s anxiety disorders. Or it’s not ADD, it’s substance abuse. Actually, comorbidity [having more than one condition] is the norm with ADHD, and that’s why it’s crucial to have medical professionals properly trained.”

It’s always great to have an article on ADHD or mental health in The Georgia Straight, unlike some unmentioned media outlets, you don’t have to worry about them stigmatizing ADHD or mental health.

Oct 192014
 

We were very fortunate to have public opinion polling expert and ex journalist Mario Caneco, who used to work for Angus Reid, and now works as Vice President for Public Affairs at Insights West do a pro bono poll for us for BC ADHD Awareness Week Oct 14-20th 2014. Thanks Mario!

They surveyed 801 BCers on very wide range of questions that I helped co write on British Columbian’s views towards ADHD in adults and children. We got some fascinating results. See the full BC ADHD survey answers.

As far as I know it is the only comprehensive survey of the general public’s opinions on ADHD ever done in BC or Canada by a professional polling company.

The question below asked was “How comfortable would you feel telling each of the following people that you were diagnosed with ADHD?” Here’s a chart I did based on Insights Wests survey of BCers listing the very comfortable and moderately comfortable answers from each category.

Insights West BC ADHD Survey question. How comfortable would you feel telling each of the following people that you were diagnosed with ADHD? Family to Boss

Can you see the patterns?

And that’s just the general public’s answers. People who have ADHD and have been judged, shamed, blamed, stigmatized for years for it will certainly have much lower numbers than that.

If you doubt that read some of the answers of my survey question on the ADHD catch 22. What Would It Take To Go Public With ADHD?

Have a look at Mario’s column in the business section of The Vancouver Sun. “Stigma of ADHD still an issue for many. Survey suggests many, especially men and older people, would not discuss an ADHD diagnosis with their employer”

The Insights West Survey clearly show a majority of bc’s workforce are afraid to come out of the ADHD closet to co-workers  or their boss. They are more comfortable in coming out to their family and friends.

Here are some excerpts from Mario’s column on Insights West’s BC ADHD survey results and implications for business, the health systems and employees in The Vancouver Sun.

This month includes ADHD Awareness Week, so Insights West did a survey of how British Columbians perceive the disorder. The results show that most residents are remarkably open to different options for treatment, but are deeply worried about the effect the revelation of an ADHD diagnosis could have on their careers.”

As expected, large majorities of respondents see little difficulty discussing this issue with their family (83 per cent) and their friends (77 per cent).

When it comes to the workplace, the results are decidedly different. Just half (51 per cent) say they would be “comfortable” disclosing an ADHD diagnosis to their co-workers, and an even smaller proportion (44 per cent) would be “comfortable” talking about the disorder with their boss.

What you’re afraid to talk about you will not likely ask for help for at work. ADHD stigma and shame keeps too many BCers hidden in the ADHD closet instead of getting the help they need and deserve. It will effect their work performance and productivity. It will impact their co-workers and the boss and the business or non profit or government workplace.

And ADHD is a very treatable condition see the Top ten ways to manage Adult ADHD. 

The groups that are most likely to be worried about disclosing an ADHD diagnosis to their co-workers and bosses are men and people aged 35-to-54 — a large component of our province’s workforce.

The views of those aged 18-to-34 provide a silver lining, as these younger workers were less likely to feel uncomfortable talking about ADHD. This generation has grown up with many open references to the disorder. Their older counterparts are clearly more preoccupied with the stigma that would accompany any public acknowledgment of an ADHD diagnosis.

The biggest discovery from the survey is the realization that many British Columbians would opt for silence at the workplace, thereby foregoing the support they would need to deal with ADHD. There may be plenty of resources available from employee assistance plans, but if employees are uncomfortable addressing the disorder at work, they will have no access to that help.

There generally aren’t much resources for adults with ADHD anywhere in BC but some employee assistance plans do cover ADHD medications, therapy (important to get one who knows ADHD otherwise it can be counterproductive, you just need to try harder, you just need to focus etc) and occasionally ADHD coaching.

Not often because we ADHD coaches are not medical professionals but I have occasionally been hired by unions EAP’s and employee assistance plans ie VPD, RCMP, corporations, etc to coach their ADHD employees to manage their ADHD more effectively at work.

The economic and social costs of ignoring ADHD are huge. Very expensive for employers, government and society to ignore us and if it’s not safe to come out of the ADHD closet at work, many BCers who have or might have ADHD may not get diagnosed or treated.

While there are many problem with having ADHD it’s not all negative. There are many positive to having ADHD  See the Top Ten Advantages of Having ADHD in a High Tech Career, especially the comments.

But if the majority of BC citizens who mainly don’t have ADHD are to afraid to come out of the ADHD closet at work as the survey shows, adults with ADHD will be even less reluctant too and therefore will be more likely to stay hidden in the ADHD closet instead of seeking help.

Owners, managers and human relations professionals in BC, what are you doing to reduce the stigma of ADHD at work to people with ADHD will be more likely to disclose and get help at work? Stigma against ADHD doesn’t just harm your employees and their families it harm’s your business or organizations profitability and productivity.

Oct 202013
 

Dr. Margaret Weiss was interviewed on News1130 Radio by News 1130 Anchor Ben Wilson Twitter, staff bio for ADHD Awareness Week in BC.

Ben did 4 Interviews on ADHD In BC During ADHD Awareness Week Starting Tues Oct 15th at 7.05pm and going until Friday October 18th. Thank Ben and special thanks to News1130′s  Bruce Claggett for helping to make this happen.  Bruce’s staff bio.

Dr Margaret Weiss MD, PhD, FRCP(C) also has a master’s degree in public health and she used to lead the BC Children’s ADHD Childrens clinic and the short lived BC Adult ADHD clinic at the same place until the BC Liberals killed it after a year long wait list of 12-14 months.

She has created an ADHD rating scale, The Weiss Functional Impairment Scale, written a book on ADHD,  ADHD in Adulthood: A Guide to Current Theory, Diagnosis, and Treatment and is on the board for CADDRA. She now runs a private clinic in West Vancouver, The Weiss Clinic for ADHD Care.

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Audio of the interview and story below.

Dr. Margaret Weiss interviewed on News1130 on BC ADHD Awareness Week

ADHD Awareness Week

UBC’s Dr. Margaret Weiss is a pre-eminant expert on the condition

John Streit

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) – All this week the News1130 Evening Show is marking ADHD Awareness Week with a series of interviews with experts in the condition, such as people who help support and coach those with it, and people who have ADHD themselves.

We wrap up our series with Dr. Margaret Weiss, a clinical professor of psychiatry at UBC and author who’s one of the pre-eminent experts on the condition.

What is ADHD?

By definition it’s a condition that is considered to be a developmental and neurobiological disorder. Genetic and neurological differences lead to hyperactivity. Not just motor-functions but talking too much, feeling restless inside, always being on the go, difficulty focusing and attention and finally, impulsivity. These are often people who are stimulus seeking and will try anything before realizing the consequences.

Is this something you’re born with or can you develop it as an adult?

We like to say it’s a common final pathway because it’s 80 per cent genetic. If you’re an adult with ADHD, the chances of each child having ADHD is 57 per cent. Same for children that come to the clinic. Many of their parents will have ADHD. In that case, yes, you are born with it. I’ve had mothers who’ve said their fetuses were different and so active that they’ve fractured a rib. On the other hand, anything that damages the brain will lead to difficulty with attention which is probably the most sophisticated part of our thinking function –  lead exposure, a traumatic brain injury, fetal alcohol syndrome will all affect and present in a similar way. We’re all paying a huge amount for this disorder but we could be paying upfront and preventing ADHD.

How has ADHD awareness increased?

There is now a recognition all over the world. This was sponsored by the World Health Organization but there’s now a strong world federation of ADHD. The emergence of awareness among families that deserves the same kind of funding, donations and services as diabetes and cancer. Just like depression and anxiety, this is not a disorder of laziness and boredom or a lack of morality, this is something we can treat.

The Weiss Clinic for ADHD Care is in West Vancouver, call 604-281-1219.

 

Oct 202013
 

Carol Walley was interviewed on News1130 Radio  by News 1130 Anchor Ben Wilson Twitter, staff bio for BC ADHD Awareness Week. Ben did 4 Interviews on ADHD In BC During ADHD Awareness Week Starting Tues Oct 15th at 7.05pm  and going until Friday October 18th. Great thanks to News1130′s  Bruce Claggett for helping to make this happen.  Bruce’s staff bio

CHADD Vancouver Logo

CHADD Vancouver is the parent group of our Vancouver Adult ADD Support Group. Carol Walley, retired public health nurse is the co-cordinator of CHADD Vancouver, Claudia Smith of the Vancouver ADHD Parent Program is the other co-coordinator.

I’m on the board of CHADD Vancouver. Carol and Claudia started CHADD Vancouver in 1996 and have kept helping parent of ADHD Children, and ADHD adults ever since.

CHADD Vancouver meets the 3rd tuesdays of most months (check schedule) at Ravensong Community Healthcare Center 2450 Ontario Street Vancouver 6.30 to 8.30 pm. Same place as my Vancouver Adult ADD Support Group but we meet the first Tuesday at 6.30-8.30pm every month

CHADD Vancouver is part of CHADD Canada and affiliated with CHADD USA

ADHD-Awareness-Poster-8.5x111.jpg

Here’s the News1130 full story

The Audio

Audio CHADD Vancouver’s Carol Walley interviewed on News1130 on BC ADHD Awareness Week

ADHD support available for parents and children

Interview with former nurse now CHADD coordinator Carol Wally

News1130 Staff October 17, 2013 9:37 pm

Related Stories and Links

•    ADHD coach Pete Quily discusses the harmful habits that can come with the condition
•    ADHD Awareness Week helping to improve diagnoses
•    Vancouver first in Canada to proclaim ADHD Awareness Week
•    Carol Wally, a co-coordinator with CHADD, talks to News1130 about ADHD

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) – All this week, we’re marking ADHD Awareness Week with a series of interviews with experts in the condition, people who help support and coach those with it, and people who have ADHD themselves.

We spoke with Carol Wally, a recently retired public health nurse who’s one of the two co-coordinators of CHADD Vancouver.

What is CHADD?

The Vancouver chapter of Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder provides information and support. We have information and support meetings on a monthly basis for anyone who is interested, mostly parents and adults that have ADHD or parents with children who have ADHD. We also provide an adult ADD support group. We also have a telephone line and email where we respond to questions that people have in the community.

What are some of the myths about ADHD?

I think one of the common ones for many years was that is wasn’t a real medical disorder, that it was more just activity or a child wasn’t managed well by his parent or ate too much sugar or had red dye. But really there’s overwhelming scientific evidence that really all medical associations and government authorities recognize ADHD as a real disorder.

Did you receive special ADHD training when you were a nurse?

No, and I think there’s not a lot of training for people who work with ADHD. One of the colleges used to have a course on ADHD. But I do believe it’s changing as the myths are dispelled and more people are aware of it and actually believe it’s a real condition. And many people know somebody who has ADHD, or knows someone with a child with ADHD or thinks somebody has ADHD so I think just the awareness of it is really helping the education as well.

What kind of advice or coaching does CHADD provide?

We really encourage parents to understand what ADHD is, that it’s a neurobiological condition. There’s information now about the functioning of the brain and learning from mistakes. There’s more and more evidence to explain it to parents. Education is really important so parents understand what it is. It’s not the child misbehaving just to bug you, it’s not something that’s being done consciously for children with ADHD – it’s very difficult. We have support meetings where they come and share with each other. That is wonderful to have parents share their frustrations and what works with each other.

What is the CHADD phone line?

It’s 604-222-4043.

Oct 172013
 

I was interviewed on News1130 Radio  by News 1130 Anchor Ben Wilson Twitter, staff bio for ADHD Awareness Week in BC Ben will do 4 Interviews on ADHD In BC During ADHD Awareness Week Starting Tues Oct 15th at 7.05pm  and going until Friday October 18th. Tomorrow is Carol Walley, CHADD Vancouver Coordinator.

Thanks to John Streit News1130’s  Evening Editor for giving me a tour of the News1130 station. Thanks to Ben Wilson for showing me the controls. Very cool he’s like a reporter, announcer, producer all in one. Here’s a photo of me by News1130 editor John Streit

Pete Quily photo in News1130 studio by John Streit

Even with the TV on the studio was so quiet it was palpable. If I every get a big windfall, would love to have a soundproof room. Very easy to concentrate for distractable adders like me. I wonder if some serial entrepreneur like Minna Van who runs The Network Hub would add soundproof rooms like that where for an extra fee people pay extra to be able to focus easier for a few hours on projects.

Much thanks to News1130′s  Bruce Claggett for helping to make this ADHD Awareness series happen.  Bruce’s staff bio.

20% of pathological gamblers have ADHD See more detail on ADHD and Gambling in this Journal of Gambling Study plus 20-30%+ addicts & alcoholics have ADHD. Many ADDers are entrepreneurs see this BC Business article listing a few & quoting me.

So BC citizens & politicians, keep ignoring, discriminating and refusing to have people trained to diagnose and treat ADHD adults and kids and you’ll continue to pay more in taxes for gambling, addiction and crime. Change that? You’ll get more legal and less criminal ADHD entrepreneurs adding jobs and building vs depleting the tax base.

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What ADHD looks like in adults, teens, and children. Courtesy teachadhd.ca

What ADHD looks like in adults, teens, and children. Courtesy teachadhd.ca

Here’s the audio, full story below

Audio of Pete Quily interviewed on News1130 on BC ADHD Awareness Week

Many problem gamblers suffer from ADHD: expert

An expert says 20 per cent of problem gamblers have ADHD

News1130 Staff

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) – In the midst of ADHD Awareness Week, we’re hearing many problem gamblers suffer from the condition.

ADHD coach Pete Quily says gambling is an impulse disorder and the three main symptoms of ADHD are hyperactivity, inattention, and impulsivity.

He says 20 per cent of pathological gamblers have ADHD, roughly 5 per cent of the population. “The government refuses to diagnose us or treat us. When you see the cost of ADHD, whether it be gambling, addiction, or jail, it’s a lot cheaper to treat us. They don’t seem to be taking it seriously, the research is out there.”

Quily says substance abuse is also a major issue. “If you have ADHD and get it treated through medication and other ways, you actually reduce the risk of substance abuse. The smallest number I’ve seen is 20 to 30 per cent of addicts and alcoholics have ADHD.”

He adds 21 to 45 per cent of prisoners in jail have ADHD.

“Don’t you think as a society we should more likely focus on getting these people the treatment they deserve and having more legal entrepreneurs, because many billions have ADHD, instead of criminal entrepreneurs who are self-medicating with booze, drugs and violence,” Quily wonders.

The News1130 Evening Show is hosting a week-long ADHD Awareness special, speaking with experts, support staff, and people that live with the condition.

News1130‘s Ben Wilson will be hosting live interviews nightly at 7:05 p.m.

 

Oct 162013
 

Jade Vajna one of our Vancouver Adult ADD Support Group Volunteers (now her 2nd year helping out, thanks Jade!) was interviewed on News1130 Radio  by News 1130 Anchor Ben Wilson Twitter, staff bio for ADHD Awareness Week in BC

Ben will do 4 Interviews on ADHD In BC During ADHD Awareness Week Starting Tues Oct 15th at 7.05pm  and going until Friday October 18th I’m up today Wednesday

Great thanks to News1130′s  Bruce Claggett for helping to make this happen.  Bruce’s staff bio

ADHD-Awareness-Poster-8.5x111.jpg

Listen to the audio, full News1130 story is below

Audio of Jade Vajna interviewed on News1130 on BC ADHD Awareness Week

ADHD Awareness Week helping to improve diagnoses

Many aren’t aware they have the condition

VANCOUVER (NEWS1130) – It’s ADHD Awareness Week.

Organizations will use the time to dispel myths, stereotypes and misinformation.

Jade Vajna is a support worker who says not a lot of people know much about the condition. “A lot of people who have it don’t realize they have it until they see a list of symptoms.”

She says she figured out she had ADHD by doing a test online. “It was 2007, a doctor suggested that I have it and then I looked into further. I realized it was me.”

Vajna says symptoms can vary. “For me, for example, I am more impulsive and hyper. It’s just not being able to sit still, being distracted very easily, getting really interested in things and then going bored with them really fast.

Vanja says increased awareness has made it easier to diagnose adults.

The News1130 Evening Show is hosting a week-long ADHD Awareness special, speaking with experts, support staff, and people that live with the condition.

News1130‘s Ben Wilson will be hosting live interviews nightly at 7:05 p.m.

Oct 142013
 

Jon McComb host of The World Today  on

CKNW News Talk 980 interviewed me today, the first day of ADHD Awareness Week in BC.

We talked about many things relating to ADHD and ADHD in BC. Got Patrick McKenna mixed up with Rick Green. Sorry guys:)

Also talked about BC politicans and the BC Adult ADHD Clinic the one BC Liberals closed in 2007 after a year long wait list and the bcndp refused to support reopening. But, the BC Conservative leader many of his candidates and the BC Greens Leader and many of her candidates including elected GPBC MLA Andrew Weaver supported reopening the clinic.

I really enjoyed it. For me having conversations on the radio is a good source of dopamine:)

Here’s the audio, click on the link.

Embed Music Files – Audio File Hosting – Pete Quily interviewed by CK…